Congratulation!

ECD-Double Degree participants  closing ceremony

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Enjoying a small snack and a drink

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Professor Yoon Jin Hwang is Professor and Head of the Department of Economics, GWNU (Gangneung Wonju National University), Gangneung, Korea. He arrived at ISS in August 2014 for a one year visiting scholarship. Yoon Jin studies various open and advanced economics.

Untitled“My major is international economics, so I’m interested in trade and industry, in particular, the role, function and competitiveness, etc., of service industry sector are the first fields of interest. Also, I’d like to study about trade patterns of service industries are not active so far among the countries.”

Professor Hwang’s Recent publications include “Non-linear Relationship between Financial Development and Industry Growth in Korea” Journal of International Growth and Commerce, 10, 2. Pp. 769-789. and “Relationship between Financial Development and Growth: Focusing on the Effect of Industry Dependence on External Finance and Industry Growth Opportunities ”, The Journal of the Korea Economics Association, 14, 4. pp. 346-354.

Mohammad ZulfanThis book uniquely examines four types of violent conflicts pertinent to contemporary Indonesia framed in a theoretical approach of grievance, greed and social contract. The overall process of democratization and decentralization has become a major force in catalysing the transformation of non-cooperative behaviours of secessionist and inter-ethnic violence to cooperative interactions of centre–regional relations and inter-ethnic political coalitions. Exploring secessionist, ethnic, routine-everyday and electoral violence conflict, the book seeks to discover what socio-economic development can do to overcome conflict and violence in Indonesia and make the country’s transition to democracy safe for its constituencies.

 

Date:

From: 04 September 2014 13:00
Till:    04 September 2014 14:00

Room: 4.42

 

Mohammad Zulfan Tadjoeddin is a Senior Lecturer in Development Studies at the University of Western Sydney, Australia. He has held visiting research appointments at the Queen Elizabeth House (QEH) of the University of Oxford, UK and at the International Institute of Social Studies (ISS) of Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands. His book titled Explaining Collective Violence in Contemporary Indonesia: From Conflict to Cooperation is published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2014.  His articles have appeared in leading academic journals, such as Journal of Development Studies, Journal of Peace Research, Oxford Development Studies, Journal of East Asian Studies, Journal of International Development, Civil Wars, Economics of Peace and Security Journal and Journal of the Asia Pacific Economy. He has consulted for various UN agencies such as ILO, UNDP and UNICEF.

EDEM researchers Natascha Wagner and Binyam Afewerk Demena gave a presentation on their research topic on Saturday 28 June at the annual International Conference of the  German Economic Association  Research Group on Development Economics.

The annual conference brings together international scholars and researchers of development economics and neighboring fields.

The 2014 Conference on Development Economics and Policy took place  from  27 to 28 June in Passau (Germany), and is hosted by the University of Passau

See conference description

 

Wagner_compressedNatascha Wagner (with S. Quimbo, J. Florentino, O. Solon, J. Peabody): Do Health Reforms  To Improve Quality Have Long-term Effects?

We tracked doctors who had previously participated in a randomized policy experiment in  the Philippines. The original experiment involved 30 district hospitals divided equally into  one control site and two interventions sites that increased insurance payments (full  insurance support for children under 5 year old) or made bonus payments to hospital staff.  During the three years of the intervention, quality- as measured by clinical performance and  value (CPV) vignettes – improved and was sustained in both intervention sites compared to  controls. Five years after the interventions were discontinued, we re-measured the quality of  care of the doctors. We found that the intervention sites continued to have significantly  higher quality compared to the control sites. The previously documented quality  improvement in intervention sites appears to be sustained; moreover it was subject to a  very low (less than 1 percent per year) rate of decay in quality scores.

Profile_Picture_2Binyam Afewerk Demena: New Wine in Old Bottles: A Meta-Analysis of FDI and Productivity  Spillovers in Developing Countries

Empirical results of Foreign Direct Investment on domestic firms productivity spillovers are  clearly mixed. This study reviews the intra-sectoral heterogeneity of productivity spillovers  from FDI in a large sample of developing countries. I investigate publication selection bias, and estimate the underlying empirical FDI-spillover effects. I collect 1,545 spillover estimates  conducted by 96 researchers from 74 empirical studies dealing with 31 developing countries  for the period of 1983 to 2013. My results suggest that FDI-spillover effects are tainted with  moderate to substantial publication bias. In combination with model misspecifications of the  primary studies, the bias overstates the Meta-effect by more than 55 per cent of the actual  magnitude of the effect. Once the biases have been corrected, the Meta-effect in the  context of developing countries is economically significant. Most importantly, I find that  spillovers and their sign depend systematically on the heterogeneity of method and  publication characteristics. Results are robust for different methods, and the study has  identified critical measurement errors of the previous Meta-Analyses.

CapeIt is argued that China’s recent official initiatives to establish special economic zones (SEZs) in Africa may present a new possibility of redirecting the trend of deindustrialization of the continent. The migration of labour-intensive manufacturing activities from China that has begun to suffer from the rising labour shortage may bring forth the hope of activating the Flying geese paradigm to Africa. However, these SEZs have been confronted with various difficulties in playing a catalytic role for local industrial development. While many of these difficulties have emanated from neither the host countries or China, others are coming from the political and cultural elements from the relations. The prospects of African industrialization seems to remain a hopeful thinking as long as these difficulties are to be effectively dealt with.

Date:

From: 01 July 2014 13:00
Till:    01 July 2014 14:00

Room: 4.42

Shigehisa Kasahara is a PhD candidate in Development Studies at the International Institute of Social Studies (ISS) of the Erasmus University of Rotterdam (EUR) in the Netherlands. He retired from the United Nations Conference Trade and Development (UNCTAD) secretariat at the end of May 2013, after having served for the organization nearly 25 years. During the professional career as an economist, he was almost always in the area of research and publication for the organization, such as the flagship publications, the Trade and Development Report, the Economic Development in Africa Report, etc. His professional interests cover a wide range of international political economy: development economics, trade and development, international trade regimes, trade development diplomacy, the role of the state (development policy), regional integration, industrialization, East Asian development (the Flying Geese paradigm), Africa, Least Developed Countries (LDCs), foreign direct investment (FDI), global value chains, institutional history of UNCTAD, etc.

Peter_11Peter van Bergeijk, presented a paper: Methodological Change in Economic Sanction Reconsidered and its Implications at The 14th Jan Tinbergen European Peace Science Conference, annual meeting of the Network of European Peace Scientists (NEPS), on 23rd – 25th of June 2014 at the International Institute of Social Studies. The conference is organized by members of the NEPS Steering Committee, in cooperation with Prof. Mansoob Murshed.

We investigate the influence of case selection and (re)coding for two vintages of a key resource for research on economic sanctions: the Peterson Institute data base reported in Hufbauer et al. (2nd edition in 1990 and 3rd edition in 2007). The Peterson Institute has not reported transparently on these changes. At the level of individual case studies we uncover a tendency to inflate success scores, reclassifying failures into successes even when the evidence for doing so was not convincing. At the level of the aggregated case studies and general methodology (Section 3) we uncovered positive bias (so methodological changes that make it more likely to find sanction success as indicated by a higher success score, either on average or in individual cases): splitting of episodes into cases and the changed definition of sanction contribution increases the success ratio in general and ultimately the share of sanctions that are judged to be a success. We also show the importance of the reclassification of destabilization cases into regime change. Our probit analysis shows that the 3rd edition’s methodology underestimates the contribution of certain sanction characteristics, including the positive impact of the costs of sanctions to the sender, duration of the sanctions and the sender’s companion policies.

AuthorsPeter A.G. Van Bergeijk, Institute of Social Studies (ISS) and Muhammad Shahadat Hossain Siddiquee, University of Dhaka

The NEPS is a network of scholars committed to the advancement of Peace Research in Europe. In line with Peace Science tradition, the NEPS welcomes scholars from an interdisciplinary community from a variety of disciplines such as economics, political science, regional science, mathematics, and history. Since 2000 NEPS holds an annual conference entitled ‘Jan Tinbergen European Peace Science Conference”.

irene van staverenEconomics after the crisis is an introductory textbook to economics from a pluralist and global perspective. This textbook covers key topics in micro and macroeconomics. However, this book differs from other introductory economics textbooks on the market in the perspective it takes, and it incorporates issues that are presently underserved by existing textbooks on the market. This book offers an introduction to economics that takes into account criticisms of the orthodox approach, and which acknowledges the role that this largely Western approach has played in the current global financial and economic crisis.

More con be found here.

Irene van Staveren is professor of pluralist development economics at the Institute of Social Studies (ISS) of Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Professor Van Staveren’s field of research included feminist economics, heterodox economics, pluralist economics and social economics. Specificaly, her field of expertises lie in ethics and economic philosophy.

She is head of the PhD programme and project leader of the online database Indices of Social Development. In addition, Van Staveren is a member of the prestigious Dutch advisory board Raad voor Maatschappelijke Ontwikkeling (transl. Council for Social Development), the think tank Sustainable Finance Lab and she is in the editorial board of the Journal of Economic IssuesReview of Social EconomyFeminist Economics and Economic Thought.

Zaman_NEPSMuhammad Badiuzzaman, EDEM PhD researcher, presented a paper: Conflict and Livelihood Decisions in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh at The 14th Jan Tinbergen European Peace Science Conference, annual meeting of the Network of European Peace Scientists (NEPS), on 23rd -25th of June 2014 at the International Institute of Social Studies. The conference is organized by members of the NEPS Steering Committee, in cooperation with Prof. Mansoob Murshed.

We analyze rural household livelihood and child school enrolment decisions in the post-conflict setting of the Chittagong Hill Tracts region of Bangladesh. The innovation of the paper lies in the fact that we employ information about current subjective perceptions regarding the possibility of violence in the future and past actual experiences of violence to explain household economic decision-making. Preferences are endogenous in line with behavioural economics. Regression results show that heightened subjective perceptions of future violence and past actual experiences of conflict influence current consumption, child enrolment and could encourage risky mixed crop cultivation. The trauma emanating from past experiences combined with current high perceptions of risk of violence may induce bolder and riskier behaviour in line with prospect theories of risk. Furthermore, a post-conflict household-level Phoenix or economic revival factor may be in operation, based partially on greater within group trust.

Authors: Muhammad Badiuzzaman and Syed Mansoob Murshed

The NEPS is a network of scholars committed to the advancement of Peace Research in Europe. In line with Peace Science tradition, the NEPS welcomes scholars from an interdisciplinary community from a variety of disciplines such as economics, political science, regional science, mathematics, and history. Since 2000 NEPS holds an annual conference entitled ‘Jan Tinbergen European Peace Science Conference”.

Zelalem YEDEM PhD researcher Zelalem Yilma Debebe presented a paper entitled “Channels of Impoverishment due to Ill-Health in Rural Ethiopia” at the Nordic Conference on Development Economics held in Helsinki, Finland on the 16th and 17th of June, 2014. The conference is co-organized by Aalto University School of Business and UNU-WIDER in collaboration with the Nordic Network in Development Economics.

This paper uses three years of household level panel data and event history interviews conducted in Ethiopia to analyse the effect of a variety of ill-health measures on household economic outcomes. We begin by examining the immediate effects of ill-health on health expenditure and labor supply, subsequently, we examine household coping responses and finally we examine the effect on household income and consumption. We find substantial financial burden in terms of increased health expenditure and income losses. Households cope by resorting to intra-household labor substitution, hiring wage labour, borrowing and depleting assets. While households are able to maintain food consumption, non-food consumption is not fully protected against certain measures of ill-health. This effect is larger for households with the lowest ability to self-insure. Maintaining current consumption through borrowing and depletion of assets and savings is unlikely to be sustainable and displays the need for interventions that work towards reducing the financial consequences of ill-health.

Authors: Zelalem YilmaAnagaw Mebratie, Robert Sparrow, Marleen Dekker, Getnet Alemu, and Arjun S. Bedi

Lead author: Zelalem Yilma Debebe

 

bg_logoboxThe 14th Jan Tinbergen European Peace Science Conference, annual meeting of the Network of European Peace Scientists (NEPS), will be held on 23rd -25th June 2014 at the International Institute of Social Studies.

This program has been arranged by members of the NEPS Steering Committee, in cooperation with Prof. Mansoob Murshed. Murshed will chair a session besides presenting paper (parallel session 4). He is invited as a panel discussant for launching ceremony of Global Peace Index-2014.

Prof. Bergeijk will chair a session besides presenting paper (parallel session 8). His paper is on “Methodological change in economic sanction reconsidered and its implication” with Muhammad Shahadat Hossain Siddiquee, University of Dhaka.

Ricardo Sousa, EDEM PhD researcher is going to present a paper on “Effect of external interventions in intra-state conflicts in Africa after the end of the cold-war”. He is also working as a research assistant for this conference.

Muhammad Badiuzzaman, EDEM PhD researcher is going to present a paper on “Conflict and livelihood decisions in the Chittagong Hill tracts of Bangladesh”. He is also working as a research assistant for this conference.

Eri Ikeda, EDEM PhD researcher is working as research assistant for this conference.

Details of the programme

International Institute of Social Studies

Economics of Development (ECD) is a Major in the MA in Development Studies. This blog provides a platform for discussion for researchers, students and others interested in this field of studies. The blog is administered by the ECD teaching team.