» Posts tagged: ‘PhD position


images

Caring Children in Malawi & East Yorkshire – Children’s Work within Families affected by Illness and Disability

This PhD studentship is an opportunity to explore across connected communities, the care-giving work children undertake for family members (parents, siblings, grandparents, other adult relatives) with differing needs for care based on chronic illness (especially HIV), associated disability/impairment, young and old age.

This studentship will investigate the outcomes of caregiving by children in the Global North and South across rural and urban locales with respect to young caregivers’ education, health, well-being and aspiration. Sharing lessons North-South and South-North through connecting stakeholder partners in Hull, East Yorkshire and Malawi in Southern Africa, the study will inform policies and interventions to support families affected by illness/disability.

This study offers a valuable opportunity to extend ongoing inter-disciplinary research by human geographers and other social scientists. Informed by a ‘new social studies of childhood’perspective and using a qualitative, participatory methodology the project aims to explore outcomes of caregiving by children for their education, physical and emotional wellbeing and aspirations.

A key objective is to identify policies and practices to support families with care needs. This will be achieved through engagement with and connecting organisations supporting young caregivers in Southern Malawi and Hull/East Riding in order to undertake fieldwork (funding available) and develop policy recommendations. Interested applicants should have relevant degree (min 2:1) or Masters in sociology, human geography, social work or related discipline

To discuss informally how you might develop this doctoral research please contact Dr Elsbeth Robson, (e.robson@hull.ac.uk) Department of Geography, Environment and Earth Science, University of Hull.

In order to qualify for this scholarship you will require at least a 2.1, but preferably a Masters degree, in a relevant subject.

Full-time UK/EU PhD Scholarship will include fees at the‘home/EU’ student rate and maintenance (£13,726 in 2014/15) for three years, depending on satisfactory progress. Full-time International Fee PhD Studentships will include full fees at the International student rate for three years, dependent on satisfactory progress.
PhD students at the University of Hull follow modules for research and transferable skills development and gain a Masters level Certificate, or Diploma, in Research Training, in addition to their research degree.

Closing date: – 3rd February 2014.

For details of how to apply please visit the 2014 PhD Studentships web pages http://www2.hull.ac.uk/researchandinnovation/connectedcommunities/phdscholarships/caringchildren.aspx

images

Funded PhD Studentship: Producing the Geographies of Childhood in Colonial Africa: Children’s Lives in Twentieth-Century Nyasaland
University of Hull , U. K.

Orthodox histories of European imperialism in Africa often celebrate formal institutions, high politics and the roles of ‘Great White Men’ in the constitution of colonial territory and society. Key figures such as Rhodes and Livingstone were significant, but they are not the whole story and these approaches neglect other marginalised social groups who also constituted the European presence in Africa. Feminist critiques have retrieved some women’s experiences in Africa as explorers, travel writers, colonial officer’s wives, teachers, nurses and missionaries.

These accounts have enriched understandings of everyday life in the colonies and offer alternative perspectives on issues of race, gender and authority. However, European colonial children remain a group routinely, and almost entirely, overlooked. This doctoral studentship will uncover and retell the stories of European children in Nyasaland whose colonial childhoods were distinct and deserve academic attention.

Children were a highly significant and distinctive presence within European colonial society. Their lives were framed by the racial hierarchies that striated colonial society: being white meant they were instantly privileged, although gender and class also inflected their status and opportunities. Likewise, illness and stark levels of child mortality also marked their lives. Many died in the colonies which shaped how families understood their ‘colonial service’ abroad. Distance also shaped these lives – with many children leading dislocated lives: being born and raised abroad and always distant from ‘home’.

This study is informed by historical children’s geographies and will develop work on the geographies of European colonial children by retrieving and retelling the stories of European children in Nyasaland 1889-1964. The studentship will examine colonial children’s life worlds and uncover their voices through autobiographies and memoirs, diaries, letters and photographs. Through archival work (in Britain and Malawi – funds available) and interviews with former colonial children this study will address research questions such as: How were the historical geographies of European settlement in Africa experienced differently by generational groups (parents and children)? How did colonial hierarchies of age and generation intersect with gender, class and racial hierarchies? What do the micro-historical geographies of families from the period of Empire look like?

In order to qualify for this scholarship you will require at least a 2.1, but preferably a Masters degree, in a relevant subject.

Full-time UK/EU PhD Scholarship will include fees at the‘home/EU’ student rate and maintenance (£13,726 in 2014/15) for three years, depending on satisfactory progress. Full-time International Fee PhD Studentships will include full fees at the International student rate for three years, dependent on satisfactory progress.
PhD students at the University of Hull follow modules for research and transferable skills development and gain a Masters level Certificate, or Diploma, in Research Training, in addition to their research degree.

Closing date: – 3rd February 2014.

Application Form and details at http://www2.hull.ac.uk/student/graduateschool/phdscholarships/fosaengineering-10.aspx

Interested applicants are encouraged to direct informal enquiries to:

Dr Elsbeth Robson E.Robson@hull.ac.uk , Dr Rosemary Wall R.Wall@hull.ac.uk , Prof David Atkinson David.Atkinson@hull.ac.uk

 

 

images

 

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST IN PhD STUDIES IN GEOGRAPHY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF OTAGO

Applications are invited from potential applicants with an interest in the topic:  ‘Families’ sense of place and place attachment’ commencing in 2014.

Supervisors: Dr Christina Ergler & Associate Professor Claire Freeman (Department of Geography, University of Otago, New Zealand)

We are seeking a student willing to embark on a PhD and interested in working on a mixed-methods project on ‘Place attachment and social connection in urbanising societies’. Whilst place attachment is an area that is of established interest to geographers the role of children in forging place attachment for families is less well understood (Weller & Bruegel, 2009, Gordon, 2012).  The project seeks to critically explore broad questions around factors contributing to and hindering place attachment. In particular, the project is interested in how family members from different New Zealand communities develop or negotiate the complexity of place attachment through their social and physical mobilities (see also Freeman, 2010). In doing so, the research contributes to debates in geography, environmental psychology and planning with reference to multiplicities of place attachment.

Students with first class Honours or Master degrees and backgrounds in human geography, planning, childhood studies or sociology are encouraged to contact us. Knowledge of or interest in developing skills in a geographic information system as well as excellent oral and written communication skills are a requirement for this project.

The project is contingent on the applicant applying for and securing a University of Otago PhD Scholarship (international or domestic), satisfying University of Otago Ph.D. entry requirements and meeting New Zealand study visa requirements, if appropriate.

If you would like to discuss the project further please contact Christina Ergler via e-mail Christina.ergler@geography.otago.ac.nz or Claire Freeman cf@geography.otago.ac.nz.  Please send a CV (including academic transcripts) and a one page covering letter outlining why you consider  that you are a suitable candidate (this should cover what skills/knowledge you bring to the project, what aspects you find particularly interesting and any ideas you may have on how the project could be developed).

Information on the Otago University Geography Department and the supervisors for this project is available on http://www.geography.otago.ac.nz/

lonDespite much research on ‘youth citizenship’, relatively little attention is paid to the role of sports.

Simon Creak’s entry on New Mandala about the role of Indonesian youth in the 2011 SEA Games is just one example of the potential of studying the role of sports in fostering young people’s sense of belonging.

For those keen studying the relation between ‘youth citizenship, sports and community development’ Longborough University (UK) may be an interesting option, not in the least since it advertises a funded PhD position in this field.

 


International Institute of Social Studies

ISS is an international graduate school of policy-oriented critical social science. It brings together students and teachers from the Global South and the North in a European environment.