» Archive for: February, 2016


‘Moving Children’

Category: migration| orphans| OVC

15 Feb 2016

leeds

Contemporary debates on children’s involvement in migration mostly pay little attention to historical instances of child movement (see also HERE). An upcoming event hosted by the University of Leeds goes some way in addressing this concern.

The event is entitled ‘Moving Children: The history of child removal in comparative perspective’ and will take place on 8 and 9 April 2016. The Call for Papers states as a central objective: ‘By illuminating continuity and change in the practice and ideology of child removal across the twentieth century, our goal is to shed comparative light on the historical experience of child removal in order to better understand the relationship between interventions into family life in the present and the past.’

One of key note speakers, Christina Firpo, presented an early version of her work in the ISS research in progress series. The full programme is pasted below.

 

Friday 8 April

9.30    Coffee and welcome

9.45    Opening remarks

10.00  Key note lecture:  Shurlee Swain: Race and Removal

 

11.30  Panel One: The Nineteenth Century

Claudia Soares (University of Manchester)

Agency, resistance and co-operation: families’ attitudes towards and experiences of child removal policies and practices in the nineteenth-century

 

Steven J. Taylor (University of Huddersfield)

British Children, Canadian Adults: Childhood Emigration to Canada in the Late-Nineteenth Century

 

12.30  Lunch

2.00    Panel Two: The Interwar Years

Mariena Hirschberg (European University Institute, Florence, Italy)
Philanthropy and problem families: The Child Emigration Society in the interwar years.

Will Jackson (University of Leeds)
Moving children: race, emotion and the politics of child removal in Cape Town, 1919-1939

Emily Baughan (University of Bristol)
“A Child to Keep For A Dollar A Week: International Adoption and Interwar Diplomacy, c. 1918-1925”

4.00      Roundtable: Understanding children – now and then

5.00      Drinks

 

 

Saturday 9 April

10.00  Panel Three: The Second World War and after

Lucy Bland (Anglia Ruskin)
‘Race and Nationhood post World War II: disputing the sending of mixed race GI offspring to the US
Verena Buser (University of Applied Sciences, Berlin)

UNRRA as identity maker: Child Search after the Second World War

 

11.30  Coffee

12.00  Roundtable: The role of the state and the role of society

1.00    Lunch

2.00    Panel Four: Authoritarian regimes

Mirjam Galley (University of Sheffield)
Builders of Communism, ‘Defective’ Children, and Social Orphans: Soviet Children in Care

Peter Anderson (University of Leeds)
Good Parents and Bad Parents: child removal in Spain in the early twentieth century

Diana Marre (Autonomous University of Barcelona)
Moving and removing children in contemporary Spain

 

4.00    Keynote lecture: Christina Firpo: A Failure of Altruism: Métis Child Welfare Programs in Vietnam 1890-1975

 

 

5.30    Drinks

download

The OpenDemocracy platform, on its Beyond Trafficking and Slavery pages, features an Open Letter endorsed by ‘over 50 leading academics, human rights practitioners, and advocates in the area of children and youth labour’. The letter urges the United Nations Committee on the Convention on the Rights of the Child ‘to avoid binding the proposed ‘General Comment on the Rights of Adolescents’ to the ILO Minimum Age Convention (No. 138) or the minimum age standards set out in that convention.’

The Open Letter also usefully rehearses the various arguments in the children’s work debate. This includes the main arguments commonly used by advocates of the minimum age of employment set out in ILO Convention No. 138, and the counterarguments. It also helpfully discusses some areas of conceptual confusion common to many a children’s work discussion, such as the problematic distinction between ‘children’s work’ and ‘child labour’. Lastly, whilst the signatories of the Open Letter are critical of the ILO Minimum Age Convention, they are in supportive of another ILO Convention: No 182 on the worst forms of child labour – provided that the full range of children’s rights is respected ‘including their protective rights such as their right to education as well as their participative rights such as their right to information, their right to participate in decisions that affect them, and their right to organize, among others. In addition, they also stress that ‘any application of ILO 182 in practice would need to take into consideration the local contexts where children work to ensure that children’s best interests are always served.’

See HERE for the full text of the Open Letter.

posted by Roy Huijsmans

 


International Institute of Social Studies

ISS is an international graduate school of policy-oriented critical social science. It brings together students and teachers from the Global South and the North in a European environment.